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We tend to see various pediatric foot conditions in our practice. Most of these foot conditions are easily treated if recognized early. Below is a nice link of some of the more common pediatric foot ailments that we see in our practice.

Image result for foot pain children

https://www.verywellhealth.com/common-pediatric-foot-problems-1337754

Foot-Friendly Tips to Prevent Common Running Injuries

Below is  a nice article from the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine with regards to injury prevention tips for road races. Please look out for weekly advice on foot injury prevention for the upcoming Charleston Marathon, Myrtle Beach 1/2/Full Marathon, and the Cooper River Bridge Run 2019. Good luck on your training!!!

Bethesda, MD – Making running part of a workout routine leads to better physical stamina and a more positive state of mind—but a detrimental foot injury can quickly stop runners in their tracks. Keeping feet healthy and pain-free can go a long way toward ensuring that every run is enjoyable, for both experienced runners and those just starting out. Following a few simple steps provided by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), before hitting the trail or treadmill, can keep foot and ankle injuries at bay.

"Some of the most common running-related foot injuries that today’s podiatrists treat are arch pain, tendonitis, and blisters," said APMA president Kathleen Stone, DPM. “However, if runners can take just a few minutes to stretch properly pre-workout, select appropriate footwear, and see a podiatrist immediately when foot pain occurs, many of these ailments can be avoided entirely.”

In order to get the most out of each run without falling victim to injury, APMA recommends the following:

Select a good running shoe: According to Karen Langone, DPM, president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine (AAPSM), the most important running tip is proper shoe selection. “A running shoe purchase is dependent upon the type of foot and function of the foot for the individual. Runners should research shoe construction and keep in mind that footwear can vary in size from one manufacturer to the other,” she said.

APMA has recently given several running shoes its Seal of Acceptance for allowing proper foot function, including models made by Puma, Mizuno, Asics, Reebok, Avia, and Ryka. A sports medicine podiatrist can help aid in the footwear selection process if needed.

Select good socks: Runners should always fit shoes with the socks that they plan on wearing during a run. Socks should be made of a poly-cotton blend that pulls moisture from the skin, fit well, and be comfortable when worn with a running shoe.

Stretch out and build momentum: Before a run, begin by warming up and gently stretching for 5-10 minutes, focusing on lower leg muscles. Amateur runners should start with short distances, increasing distance over time to help prevent injury. All runners should begin every workout slowly, as this allows the body to warm up further and decreases the chance of muscle strain. Runners should also focus on keeping both the feet and entire body relaxed, avoid tensing or cramping toes, and run with a gait that feels the most natural. Cease running immediately if any pain is experienced.

Cool down and rest: After reaching the end of a running workout, cool down and stretch for about 10 minutes. Submerging the lower extremities in an ice bath after longer runs can reduce muscle soreness, as can the use of a self-massager designed for post-athletic activities (Health Enterprises Therapeutic Hot & Cold Foot Massager has the APMA’s Seal of Acceptance).

Muscle pain is common after exercise, and minor injuries may be treated with the RICE regimen (rest, ice, compression, elevation). However, if pain does not resolve itself after several days—or returns immediately upon resuming exercise—runners should seek out care from an APMA member podiatrist immediately.

Frequent runners should see a podiatrist on a regular basis to maximize any running program and prevent serious injury. For more on running and foot health, visit APMA’s new Runner’s Resource page at www.apma.org.

I wanted to spend some time today addressing a common athletic foot injury that I see very commonly in women. The injury that I frequently see is a metatarsal stress fracture. This short blog will give you valuable information of how to recognize and treat this common sports related injury.

Typically a metatarsal stress fracture will presents acutely with pain and swelling on top of foot just at the base of the lesser toes. The most common symptom is pain and swelling to the dorsal forefoot with or without trauma. Stress fractures often result from increasing the amount or intensity of an activity too quickly. This could be due to increasing the amount of mileage associated with walking or running while training for a road race. Other factors found more commonly in women would be poor bone density (osteoporosis), low body weight,  and menstrual disturbances.

Oftentimes I will see patient's that present with pain four weeks prior and they may have initially had a X-ray that was negative for a stress fracture. When we see a patient for the first time four weeks after the symptoms manifested we then take a repeat X-rays which shows a stress fracture. It may take 10-14 for a stress fracture to be visible on X-ray examination. Typically bone callus on both sides of the metatarsal will confirm the stress fracture is healing. If a metatarsal stress fracture is not promptly treated with immobilization with a cam walker and reduction of activity this could lead to further swelling/pain and possible delayed healing of the fracture.

Stress fractures take 6-8 weeks to heal and are treated with either a surgical shoe or cam walker boot. We do advocate low impact non-weight bearing activity to keep patient's active such as swimming or biking during the healing phase.

A protein deficiency, along with an overall calorie-deficient diet can relate to associated medical problems. One of these could include loss of regular menstrual cycles. Estrogen levels decline when menustration stops. This drop in estrogen leaves the bones in the body more prone to a stress fracture.

I usually recommend that women over 40 follow up with their family doctor for a bone density test. Certain blood work can be ordered such as determination of calcium, potassium, and magnesium levels which are vital for proper bone health.

If you have noticed increased pain and swelling on the top of your foot this could be a stress fracture. This is not normal and it is essential that this be treated to ensure the fracture heals correctly.

Dr. Brown and Dr. Saffer have all the available clincial and diagostic tools to diagnosis this condition correctly and can expedite the healing of this common sports related foot injury.

If you have suffered from chronic heel pain and your symptoms have not improved with traditional conservative treatments options then we may have a solution that will cure your heel pain for good.

We are offering a new treatment modality for chronic heel pain called (EPAT) Extracorpeal pulse activation technology. Intense pulse sound waves are introduced into the soft tissues to break up scar tissue and increased blood flow to the injured area. This procedure reduces pain and inflammation as well as stimulates your own bodies healing mechanism. 

The advantages of this procedure are:

1)Painless

2)No down time

3) No anesthesia

4) In office procedure

Typically, the procedures takes 5 minutes and is done weekly for three weeks.

After the treatment you will experience decreased pain and begin to have relief from symptoms which continues to improve over a 3-5 week period.

So, if you experience chronic heel pain make an appointment with our practice to see if you are a candidate for EPAT.

https://www.carolinafootspecialists.net/heel-pain.html





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