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Posts for tag: Sports Podiatrist Mt. Pleasant

Sever's Disease: Growth Plate Injury in a Child's Heel

 
 
 
We would like to talk about a common heel pain condition that we see in children and adolescents between the ages of 8-16. Sever's Disease or Calcaneal apophsitis is a growth plate injury of the heel often misdiagnosed as plantar fascitis. We are starting to see this injury more often most likely because of year round travel sport teams as well young children specializing in one sport without  variety as well as much needed rest. This is typically an overuse injury of the growth plate of the heel. The heel bone is called the "calcaneus" and has an important growth plate at the base. Boys from 8 to 14 and Girls 7 to 13 can have pain develop in this area either from the pull of the achilles tendon, or the pull of the plantar fascia. We see this in sports such as basketball, running, baseball, gymnastics, and tennis. After those ages, the growth plates will fuse and there can no longer be a source of pain. This form of heel pain can disrupt activity and be frustrating for children as well as their parents. If recognized and diagnosed promptly, conservative treatment will usually resolve this condition rather quickly.
 
     The basic rule is to create a pain free environment with no limping. Treatment consist of ice, oral NSAIDS, stretching, achilles/plantar fascial night splint, heel lifts/heel cushions, custom orthotics, physical therapy, and in extreme cases cam walker boot/cast immobilization. Physical therapy modalities such as electrical stimulation, iontophoresis, dry needling of the calf, and achilles stretching can be useful ways to resolve this condition. Brief modification of exercise routine to more low impact can help the growth plate to heal.
 
If your children are suffering from heel pain it is important to have them seen as soon as possible. The faster that this condition is recognized and treated the quicker your children will have resolution of heel pain which will allow them to resume to the sports that they love to participate in.
 
For more information please refer to our website: www.carolinafootspecialists.net

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common complaints that we see in our practice.  The number of patients known to have the problem is estimated to be between six and seven million.

Many patients attempt to treat the problem at home prior to seeking treatment from a doctor which is fine unless the problem has been present for an extended period of time, usually between 3-6 months. That is when they often learn about Plantar Fasciopathy for the first time.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PLANTAR FASCIITIS AND PLANTAR FASCIOPATHY?

 

Plantar fasciitis is actually divided into conditions with two different treatment requirements. Acute plantar fasciitis is an inflammatory condition and is associated with irritation and inflammation of the plantar fascia at its insertion on the heel region.

After six months this develops into chronic plantar fasciitis, the problem actually changes and and is referred to as plantar fasciopathy. Plantar fasciopathy is non-inflammatory and there is a lack of blood supply to the region and the body thinks of the problem as being normal. This lack of blood supply results in the body not responding to the condition and therefore a lack of healing potential in the region.

IS PLANTAR FASCIITIS AND PLANTAR FASCIOPATHY TREATED DIFFERENTLY?

Treatment for these two conditions is very different and we would like to educate you on new and improved treatments for chronic plantar fasciopathy.

If plantar fasciitis is treated early and aggressively, it is often not very difficult to treat. Treatment options include stretching, night splints, oral NSAIDS, shoe modifications to a stiffer and stronger sole, added arch support or custom orthotics, physical therapy and cortisone injection therapy.

Chronic plantar fasciopathy, there is NO inflammation present and there is a chronic scar tissue formation in the heel region with the body not responding to the region. The goal of treatment is to INCREASE inflammation and return the body’s blood supply to the region to help with healing.

Typically conservative treatments used for acute plantar fasciitis do not usually work well in these situations.

CHRONIC PLANTAR FASCIOPATHY TREATMENTS

Our common treatments in chronic plantar fasciopathy include aggressive physical therapy with additional custom arch support and shoe modifications. However, in many cases, there is a need for noninvasive and minimally invasive therapy to increase blood to the region.

Treatment options plantar Fasciopathy

Treatment options cause an irritation of the region of the plantar fascia that’s non-responsive and lacking the healing blood supply. This will result in a return of blood to the area and take the chronic condition and make it more acute which can then allow the body to heal the region.

Shockwave Therapy (EPAT)

Shockwave therapy has been around for about 30 years and is basically a small jack hammer that is hitting the heel area and breaking up scar tissue. Much like someone hitting your shoulder over and over with a punch which causes inflammation, the concept of shockwave therapy is to cause minor damage to the region and increase blood supply. It is a treatment that can work well but is somewhat obsolete. The main benefit is that the treatment is fairly simple and does not involve injection or internal treatment.

Platelet Rich Plasma and Amniotic Injections

PRP and amniotic injections are used to bring the patient’s own blood cells and healing cells to the region of chronic injury. Both treatments help recruit cells necessary to heal and have a very strong result in our hands. These treatments work well but can be somewhat painful and moderate to severe cases of scar formation may not respond well to this treatment.

Radio Frequency Ablation (TOPAZ)

There is a group of patients who have such extensive plantar fasciopathy that the PRP and amniotic injection are not strong enough to treat. In such cases, radio frequency ablation was used to break up the scar tissue with a small needle probe. The previous treatments such as Topaz used approximately 20-30 small needle holes made through the skin on the bottom of the foot to break up the scar tissue on the sole of the foot.

 

The Tenjet System for Chronic Plantar Fasciopathy (Our practice is currently researching this new technology and looking at long term studies)

 

The Tenjet system releases a high-power water jet into the region of the plantar fascia scar tissue and damage. The system is used under ultrasound guidance and the water jet which breaks up the scar tissue is connected to suction and the scar tissue is sucked out after it is broken up by the water jet.

WHAT’S THE BEST TREATMENT OPTION FOR CHRONIC PLANTAR FASCIITIS TREATMENT?

The best treatment always depends on the patient and their individual condition. So the first thing we do is separate patients into two distinct groups, those with acute plantar fascia (suffering less than six months) and those that have truly chronic plantar fascia issues.

Acute treatment for Plantar Fascia patients includes:

  • Shoe modification/recommendations
  • Custom Orthotics
  • Physical therapy
  • Tapings
  • Oral NSAIDS
  • Possible steroid injection

In conclusion, if you have been suffering from acute or chronic heel pain then please visit our Sports Podiatrist at Carolina Foot Specialists so that we can figure out the cause of your heel pain and work on solutions to resolve your pain.

Dr. Andrew Saffer-CFS Mount Pleasant 843-654-8250

Dr. Adam Brown-CFS Charleston 843-225-5575

www.carolinafootspecialists.net

Modern-Plantar-Fasciitis-Treatment-Options-Explained

We hope your training is going well for the upcoming Cooper River Bridge Run 2019! One of the top Sports Podiatrist in our field has a really informative youtube video on common running injuries. It is about an hour video but we feel would be worth taking some time to listen to the video especially if you have been suffering from various running injuries of the lower extremity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bgoIdnqNhM&feature=youtu.be

If you are suffering from nagging foot or ankle ailments please give our offices a call so we can help complete your training and resolve your foot/ankle pain.

Dr. Adam Brown-Charleston: 843-225-5575

Dr. Andrew Saffer-Mt. Pleasant: 843-654-8250

Image result for cooper river bridge run 2019

Hope your traiing is going well for the upcoming Cooper River Bridge Run 2019. It is less than a month away! If you have been suffering from nagging lower extremity injuries from running and it is impacting your training please give our offices a call so we can diagnose and resolve your specfic injuries.

Check out this nice article on detecting the most common running injuries.

https://mytopfitness.com/index.php/2018/09/07/running-injuries/

Dr. Andrew Saffer-Mount Pleasant: 843-654-8250

Dr. Adam Brown-Charleston: 843-225-5575

Image result for running injuries