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Posts for tag: Sports Podiatrist Charleston

We tend to see various pediatric foot conditions in our practice. Most of these foot conditions are easily treated if recognized early. Below is a nice link of some of the more common pediatric foot ailments that we see in our practice.

Image result for foot pain children

https://www.verywellhealth.com/common-pediatric-foot-problems-1337754

Foot-Friendly Tips to Prevent Common Running Injuries

Below is  a nice article from the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine with regards to injury prevention tips for road races. Please look out for weekly advice on foot injury prevention for the upcoming Charleston Marathon, Myrtle Beach 1/2/Full Marathon, and the Cooper River Bridge Run 2019. Good luck on your training!!!

Bethesda, MD – Making running part of a workout routine leads to better physical stamina and a more positive state of mind—but a detrimental foot injury can quickly stop runners in their tracks. Keeping feet healthy and pain-free can go a long way toward ensuring that every run is enjoyable, for both experienced runners and those just starting out. Following a few simple steps provided by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), before hitting the trail or treadmill, can keep foot and ankle injuries at bay.

"Some of the most common running-related foot injuries that today’s podiatrists treat are arch pain, tendonitis, and blisters," said APMA president Kathleen Stone, DPM. “However, if runners can take just a few minutes to stretch properly pre-workout, select appropriate footwear, and see a podiatrist immediately when foot pain occurs, many of these ailments can be avoided entirely.”

In order to get the most out of each run without falling victim to injury, APMA recommends the following:

Select a good running shoe: According to Karen Langone, DPM, president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine (AAPSM), the most important running tip is proper shoe selection. “A running shoe purchase is dependent upon the type of foot and function of the foot for the individual. Runners should research shoe construction and keep in mind that footwear can vary in size from one manufacturer to the other,” she said.

APMA has recently given several running shoes its Seal of Acceptance for allowing proper foot function, including models made by Puma, Mizuno, Asics, Reebok, Avia, and Ryka. A sports medicine podiatrist can help aid in the footwear selection process if needed.

Select good socks: Runners should always fit shoes with the socks that they plan on wearing during a run. Socks should be made of a poly-cotton blend that pulls moisture from the skin, fit well, and be comfortable when worn with a running shoe.

Stretch out and build momentum: Before a run, begin by warming up and gently stretching for 5-10 minutes, focusing on lower leg muscles. Amateur runners should start with short distances, increasing distance over time to help prevent injury. All runners should begin every workout slowly, as this allows the body to warm up further and decreases the chance of muscle strain. Runners should also focus on keeping both the feet and entire body relaxed, avoid tensing or cramping toes, and run with a gait that feels the most natural. Cease running immediately if any pain is experienced.

Cool down and rest: After reaching the end of a running workout, cool down and stretch for about 10 minutes. Submerging the lower extremities in an ice bath after longer runs can reduce muscle soreness, as can the use of a self-massager designed for post-athletic activities (Health Enterprises Therapeutic Hot & Cold Foot Massager has the APMA’s Seal of Acceptance).

Muscle pain is common after exercise, and minor injuries may be treated with the RICE regimen (rest, ice, compression, elevation). However, if pain does not resolve itself after several days—or returns immediately upon resuming exercise—runners should seek out care from an APMA member podiatrist immediately.

Frequent runners should see a podiatrist on a regular basis to maximize any running program and prevent serious injury. For more on running and foot health, visit APMA’s new Runner’s Resource page at www.apma.org.

Foot blisters can be a frustrating foot condition. Foot blisters are caused by friction, usually your shoes or socks rubbing against your skin. Anything that intensifies rubbing can start a blister, including increasing your pace, poor-fitting shoes, and  improper socks.  Heat and moisture intensify friction by making your feet swell. That explains why many runners only suffer blisters during races, especially marathons.

The body responds to the friction by producing fluid, which builds up beneath the part of the skin being rubbed, causing pressure and pain. While most blisters don't pose a serious health risk, they can have a negative impact on your exerices routine.

First Aid

If you have a large blister that is painful you can drain it with a sterile needle. If you don't drain it, your blister will hurt, and it could puncture on its own or cause a potential infection. To drain a blister first wash your hands, then wipe a needle with alcohol to sterilize it. It is not recommended to heat the needle.Once you've punctured the blister, carefully drain the liquid by pushing gently with your fingers near the hole. Then cover the blister with a tight bandage to keep bacteria from getting in. You can take the bandage off periodically and soak your foot in warm water and Epsom salts to draw out the fluid. After soaking, put on a fresh bandage. If you have a small blister that is not necessarily painful leave it intact. The skin acts as a protective covering over a sterile environment. Furthermore, if the fluid amount is small and you try to pop it, you could cause additional problems by making it bleed.

Blister prevention tips:

Choose blister-free socks. Synthetic socks wick moisture away from the skin. Cotton may be lighter, but it retains fluid. It is well worth spending a little extra money on this type of sock at a local sporting goods or running store.

Run with slick skin. Coat your feet with Vaseline or another lubricant before you run. Or use Second Skin, a padded tape that stays on even when wet. Both methods form a protective shield between your skin and sock.

Wear shoes and socks that fit. Shoes that are too small will cause blisters under the toes and on the ends of the toenails. There should be a thumb's width of space between the toes and end of the toe box. Your socks should fit smoothly, with no extra fabric at the toes or heels.

Products over the counter for blister care: Moleskin, Body glide, Foot Glide, Compeed blister pads, Blister shield, gold bond powder, and aquaphor healing ointment.

If you have any upcoming races and have experienced chronic foot blisters please contact at: Carolinafootspecialists.net