My Blog

Posts for tag: Bunions

By drsaffer
June 19, 2012
Category: Foot Surgery
Tags: Bunions  

Bunion surgery is one of the most common surgeries that Dr. Brown and Dr. Saffer perform in our practice. If conservative treatment does not resolve the pain then surgery is an option. The typical recovery time for bunion surgery is anywhere from 6 -8 weeks. The surgery usually is in an outpatient surgery center and involves local and IV sedation. The surgery take about an hour to perform. We typically utilize scew fixation for our bunions. This allows our patients to weight bear in a protective boot right after surgery. We have our patients wear the walking boot for about 6-8 weeks with a transfer into a sneaker about week seven. Active range of motion exercises are to be started the week after surgery. Pain medication is typically used for the first one to two days after surgery. Exercise routines after the six to seven week period of time are tailored around the specific activity our patients our involved with.

For more information on bunions and bunion surgery please refer to our website at carolinafootspecialists.net.

By drsaffer
September 13, 2010
Category: Lecture
Tags: heel pain   Bunions   hammer toes  

Carolina Foot Specialists will be presenting a talk on "My Foot Hurts - Medical Solutions for Hammertoes, Bunions, and Heel Pain".
The presentation will be this Wednesday September 15th at 10:00am at East Cooper Hospital. For more information please contact East Cooper Hospital or our office in Mt. Pleasant.
http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2010/sep/14/hammertoe-help/

Carolinafootspecialists.net

By drsaffer
July 02, 2010
Category: Foot Surgery
Tags: Bunions  

1. Are bunions hereditary?

Bunions are most often caused by an inherited faulty mechanic structure of the foot. It is not the bunion itself that is inherited, but certain foot types that make a person prone to developing a bunion.
2. Do over-the-counter pads and splints really work?

Pads placed over the area of the bunion may help minimize pain from a bunion. However, padding and splinting cannot reverse a bunion deformity.
3. Will my bunion get worse?

Because bunions are progressive, they don't go away, and will usually get worse over time. But not all cases are alike. Some bunions progress more rapidly than others.
4. Is it better to have it fixed now, or should I wait?

When the pain of a bunion interferes with daily activities, it's time to discuss surgical options with your foot and ankle surgeon. Together you can decide if surgery is best for you.
5. How can I avoid surgery?

Sometimes observation of the bunion is all that's needed. A periodic office evaluation and x-ray examination can determine if your bunion deformity is advancing, thereby reducing your chance of irreversible damage to the joint. In many other cases, however, some type of treatment is needed, such as changes in shoes, padding, activity modifications, pain medications, icing, injection therapy, and orthotic devices.

When the pain of a bunion interferes with daily activities, it's time to discuss surgical options with your foot and ankle surgeon. Together you can decide if surgery is best for you.
6. Will my insurance company pay for the surgery?

In most cases, yes.
7. Is the surgery painful?

The amount of pain experienced after bunion surgery is different from one person to the next. Most patients will experience discomfort for three to five days. If you closely follow your foot and ankle surgeon's instructions, you can help minimize pain and swelling after your bunion surgery.
8. What type of anesthesia is involved?

Most bunion surgeries involve local anesthesia with intravenous sedation. That means your foot will be numb and you will be given medications to relax you during the procedure.
9. If I need surgery, how long will recovery take?

The length of the recovery period will vary, depending on the procedure or procedures performed. Your foot and ankle surgeon will provide you with detailed information about your recovery.
10. Will I be able to walk normally, or even exercise and run, after healing from bunion surgery?

In most cases, yes.
11. How soon can I walk after surgery?

It depends on your bunion and the surgical procedure selected for you.
12. How soon can I go back to work after surgery?

The length of the recovery period will vary, depending on the procedure or procedures performed.
13. How soon can I drive after surgery?

The length of the recovery period will vary, depending on the procedure or procedures performed.
14. Can the bunion come back?

Yes, there is a risk for bunion recurrence in some cases. Patients can help prevent this by following their doctor's instructions to wear arch supports or orthotics in their shoe.
15. If screws or plates are implanted in my foot to correct my bunion, will they set off metal detectors?

Not usually. It can depend on the device chosen for your procedure, as well as how sensitive the metal detectors are.